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Evangelical Homes of Michigan Senior & Assisted Living in Michigan | Saline, Detroit, Sterling Heights and Ann Arbor


Go Red! Celebrate Your Health
Go Red! Celebrate Your Health

Go Red!

February is American Heart Month and on February 2nd, the American Heart Association and the National Institutes of Health celebrate National Wear Red Day to bring attention to the number one killer of women, heart disease. 

 

Celebrate Your Health!

When it comes to heart health, there are some changes that pack a big punch.  Celebrate your health and the health of others in you life by making these strategies a priority:

• Move More.  The more active you are, the better you will feel and the lower your risk for heart disease will be.  All activity sounds, so don't skip it if you are short on time.  Ten minutes, three times a day is enough to make a difference.

• Eat more of the good stuff.  Registered Dietitian at EHM Senior Solutions in Saline, MI, Rebecca Round recommends "One way to “eat more of the good stuff” is by drinking green smoothies. They are a fast and easy way to get your veggies in the morning. Smoothies are portable which makes them the perfect breakfast for a person on the go. Just mix yogurt with frozen fruits and green leafy vegetables and blend till smooth. Add flax or chia seeds to add more fiber and heart healthy antioxidants. There’s no limit to the combinations of smoothie flavors, so let your imagination run wild. If you’re not a person who likes to experiment, the internet is a great source of recipes for those new to the green smoothie craze. So raise a glass of the “green” stuff and drink to your heart health!"

• Eat less of the not so good stuff.  Foods that are high in sodium (salt), trans or saturated fat, and added sugar such as bacon or packaged snacks and desserts, increase your heart disease risk and should be reduced.  

• Know where you stand - not all risk factors are obvious and some developing heart symptoms have no symptoms at all.  Check in with your doctor regularly to see what your personal heart disease risk is.  

Check out the American Heart Association to learn more at www.heart.org